“The Rising Sun”, our first album

Scan of the album…

YOU’D BETTER RUN • An anti-FN song that deals with a boy who watches TV and discovers MLP. “The inspiration dates back to 2014 when I heard her words, I felt the need to write about that” (Ylias)
The heavy rhythm of the song may mean a kind of gloominess and the Oriental part a kind of provocation…

STRANGE FEELING • It’s about an unreachable, allegorical love everybody can relate to. There’s a clear change of tone between the first part – a kind of dream, an “ideal” love – and the second one – more realistic, down-to-earth. It’s a strange feeling, it’s the unknown.

DON’T THINK YOU’RE A QUEEN • One of Ylias’ first compositions: “I was in a relationship with a girl, it didn’t work and we broke up in pretty bad terms. She just came back to me thinking I’d do the same – I didn’t.” Alright.

MYSTIC • A one-night meeting in the south of France, a mystic break during an epic summer near Sainte-Marie de la Mer…

THEY’LL CHANGE • A cry of anger against inequalities, injustice and unilateral power, an appeal to a “collective awakening”: we were born equal, why splitting?

BRAINMARKS • In our society we’re always asked to have diplomas to test our capacities in fields we don’t necessarily belong, in order to access a certain position allowing us to live serenely. If you don’t have a diploma in a field you excel in, your life is uncertain because of this judging system… This is what this song criticizes.

SWEET FATHERS BLUES • A traditional blues slow, similar to Buddy Guy, like in Chicago, except that it deals with something rather unusual for this kind of music: parents. It’s an acknowledgment for everything they’re doing for us and we don’t see. Our behaviour is mostly dictated by our education and the environment we blossom in…

OLYA • A critic of the way too many men behave around women, a nice lesson about respect, an ode to women.

LOLY (INSTRUMENTAL) • The band’s very first creation – it’s logical to put at the end of the album, right? Just a beautiful instrumental song which gained meaning through time. “The song was initially pretty fast, but since my best friend Lorenzo – aka ‘Loly’ – kept on asking me to play it, I thought it might be fun to adjust the tempo on the – very slow – rhythm of my friend’s moves…” The atmosphere is clearly marked by Jazz but with a Blues touch, just like Stevia Ray Vaughan’s ‘Lenny’ – in all modesty. This is a strong but quiet song, a gentle strength, an opening to another universe, foreshadowed by the last saxophone notes, a graceful flight as a conclusion, an ellipsis rather than a full stop…